Reel pride - Page 3

What to see (or skip) as the huge Frameline 38 LGBT film festival takes over the city

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Run for it: 'Futuro Beach'
COURTESY OF FRAMELINE

Violette (Martin Provost, France, 2013) Taking on another "difficult" woman artist after the excellent 2008 Séraphine (about the folk-art painter), Martin Provost here portrays the unhappy life of Violette Leduc (Emmanuelle Devos), whose fiction and autobiographical writings eventually made her a significant figure in postwar French literature. We first meet her waiting out the war with gay author Maurice Sachs (Olivier Py), one of many unrequited loves, then surviving via the black market trade before she's "discovered" by such groundbreaking, already-established talents as Jean Genet (Jacques Bonnaffé) and Simone de Beauvoir (Sandrine Kiberlain). It is the latter, a loyal supporter who nonetheless retains a chilly emotional distance, who becomes bisexual Violette's principal obsession over the coming 20 years or so. Devos does her best to portray "a neurotic crazy washed-up old bag" with an "ugly mug" — hardly! — who is perpetually broke, depressed, and awkward, thanks no doubt in part to her mean witch of a mother (Catherine Hiegel). "Screaming and sobbing won't get you anywhere," Simone at one point tells her, and indeed Leduc is a bit of a pill. For the most part lacking the visual splendors of Séraphine (this character's environs weren't so pastoral), Violette is finely acted and crafted but, like its heroine, hard to love. Note: Frameline is also showing Violette Leduc: In Pursuit of Love, a documentary on the same subject. Mon/23, 9:15pm, Castro. (Harvey)

To Be Takei (Jennifer Kroot, US) The erstwhile and forever Mr. Sulu's surprisingly high public profile these days no doubt sparked this documentary portrait by SF's own Jennifer Kroot (2009's It Came From Kuchar). But she gives it dramatic heft by highlighting the subject's formative years in World War II Japanese-American internment camps, and finds plenty of verite humor in the everyday byplay between fairly recently "out" gay celebrity George and his longtime life and business partner Brad Altman — the detail-oriented, pessimistic worrywart to his eternally upbeat (if sometimes tactlessly critical) star personality. We get glimpses of them in the fan nerdsphere, on The Howard Stern Show, at Takei's frequent speaking engagements (on internment and gay rights), and in his latter-day acting career both as perpetual TV guest and a performer in a hopefully Broadway-bound new musical (about internment). Then of course there's the Star Trek universe, with all surviving major participants heard from, including ebullient Nichelle Nichols, sad-sack Walter Koenig, thoughtfully distanced Leonard Nimoy, and natch, the Shat (who acts like a total asshat, dismissing Takei as somebody he sorta kinda knew professionally 50 years ago.) We also hear from younger Asian American actors who view the subject as a role model, even if some of his actual roles weren't so trailblazing (like a couple "funny Chinaman" parts in Jerry Lewis movies, and in John Wayne's 1968 pro-Vietnam War film The Green Berets). Even if you've tired of Takei's ubiquity online and onscreen, this campy but fond tribute is great fun. Tue/24, 6:30pm, Castro. (Harvey)

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